IAN YOUNG | Photo Illustration

Are students too relaxed about the dress code?

IAN YOUNG | Photo Illustration

IAN YOUNG | Photo Illustration

Summer has started and students on the BYU-Idaho campus are dressing for it.

Janae Rich, a senior studying child development, said students are starting to become more complacent with not following the Honor Code because no one says anything to those who violate the rules.

“We sign the Honor Code, but then we don’t follow it, and the administration doesn’t care,” Rich said. “So it’s like, ‘Why do we have to sign it then?’”

Brent Bean, a faculty member in the Department of Communication, said enforcement has changed since he went to school here. Bean said that while he was a student, a teacher stopped him because he was not wearing socks and told him that was inappropriate.

Bean said students are in violation all the time and no one says anything. He said there are trainers in the Hart Gym who have inappropriate attire on.

Bean said that without enforcement, students get the attitude that they can wear whatever they want and no one will say anything to them.

Tyler Barton, an administrator in the Student Honor Office, said he thinks communication about the importance of the Honor Code would be more effective coming from roommates and friends when talking about what is OK to wear.

Barton said students and faculty should talk to students who are not following the standards in a loving and humble way that will help them not feel like they are being judged.

Eric Gaspar, a sophomore majoring in general studies, said people are too relaxed when it comes to the dress and grooming standards. They use the weather as an excuse to wear things that are not in-line with the Honor Code.

Gaspar said he thinks it is easier for guys to comply to the dress and grooming standards. He said there is a drastic difference between female and male appare, and it is harder to see the violations on men because it is not as obvious.

“I walk around campus and see people with beards or scruff and think ‘It’s not that hard to shave your face,’” Gaspar said. “We still have to respect the Honor Code. We still have to come to class ready to learn.”

Gaspar said he thinks faculty members are laid-back when it comes to talking to students about what they are wearing or whether or not they have shaved. He said he sees students who are dressed inappropriately, and faculty members do not enforce the standards.

“This is my first spring semester,” Gaspar said. “It’s so different from fall and winter, when everyone covers up. It is interesting to me to see how relaxed everyone is about honoring the dress code.”

“I feel like when I first came to BYU-I, the Honor Code was spoken about on a regular basis,” said Erin McMahon, a junior studying communication. “Now that I am back from my mission, I see more people rolling up their jeans to make capris or people wearing flip-flops.”

McMahon said she feels students do not know that what they are doing is wrong and against the dress and grooming standards.

She said she has seen a decrease in commitment to the Honor Code by students than she saw before her mission.

“I don’t think there is a constant voice when it comes to faculty members talking about the dress code with students,” McMahon said. “I think faculty members should be helping students see what they are doing is wrong because many students don’t know what is wrong and what isn’t.”

McMahon said the school is very strict about what can and cannot be worn for events, but for everyday walking around or going to class on campus, people will not say anything.

“I feel like the Honor Code isn’t supposed to be just an every-once-and-a while thing, but it is established to be enforced at all times and in all places on this campus,” McMahon said. “We know the standards. We signed up for it.”

Bean said he sees the majority of the student body dressing according to the Honor Code, so he does not think it is an epidemic.

Barton said there are blessings now and in the future for following the Honor Code.

He said no one knows what those blessing are yet, but if students follow the standard that has been set, whether it is shaving or not wearing leggings or capris, then they will not lose out on those blessings.

Copyright 2015 BYU-I Scroll