BYU-Idaho Center

Athletes’ preparation precedes success

Athletes at BYU-Idaho dedicate time, talent and energy to compete in their respective sports to find success and achieve victory. The preparation behind this dedicated drive begins before an athlete enters into competition, according to the NCAA. A training regimen of healthy dieting and exercising can help prepare student athletes to compete at their highest level. 

“I eat well and get adequate sleep,” said Hyrum Dyches, a senior studying health science.

Dyches said being physically and mentally prepared allows him to give everything he has.

“It is important to eat well because that is how you gain your energy,” said Jared Mason, a freshman studying business management. “If you’re eating the right amount of fruits and vegetables and protein, your body won’t let you down.”

Eating properly allows athletes to build their stamina and strength naturally, according to WebMD. Foods that provide large amounts of carbohydrates are recommended for athletes because the body transforms carbohydrates into sugars that muscles use to create energy. With adequate energy and rest, athletes are prepared to give it their all while competing.  

“You have to have the right mind set to compete,” Mason said. “You can’t be focused on everyday things. You have to be focused on what’s on the field.”

Mason said focus comes from preparing the mind with sleep and allowing the body and mind to rest before participating in a sport.

“Give yourself time to relax,” Mason said. “I played football in high school, and, between school and practice, we had time to visualize and unwind before we went on the field.”

Competing against others motivates many athletes to perform at their peak.

“The desire to win motivates me to compete,” said Kenzie Donaldson, a sophomore studying biochemistry. 

Donaldson said feelings of success and accomplishment further motivate her to continue training for future competitions.

Finding purpose in competing gives athletes an extra push to pursue their goals.

“I would always play for something,” Mason said. “If there was no purpose, I did not feel like I would be properly motivated.”

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