This year the amount of Americans who consider the Bible to be the word of God hit a record low of 24 percent, according to a poll taken by Gallup.

Gallup conducted its annual poll in May to collect American citizens’ views on the Bible. The telephonic interviews showed biblical literalism, or belief in the Bible as the literal word of God, is dropping across the board, according to Gallup.

“Over the past three decades, Americans’ view of the Bible as the literal word of God has been declining, while their view that the Bible is a collection of fables, myths and history recorded by man has been increasing,” according to the report from Gallup.

For the first time in four decades, the percentage of people who do not consider the Bible to be divine at all has exceeded the percentage of people who take it as the literal word of God.

“Over the past three decades, Americans’ view of the Bible as the literal word of God has been declining, while their view that the Bible is a collection of fables, myths and history recorded by man has been increasing.”

Gallup

Record Few Americans Believe Bible Is Literal Word of God

“Men, whites, adults aged 18 to 29 as well as those aged 30 to 49, and college graduates lean in the opposite direction (than nonwhites, adults aged 50 and older, and adults with no college education), with more being skeptics than literalists,” according to the poll. “Still, in (all groups) the largest segment takes the middle position, believing the Bible reflects the inspired word of God.”

Within the last 30 years the number of individuals between the ages of 18 and 29 who take the Bible literally fell from 32 percent to 12 percent, making it the most dramatic change of all the data collected, according to Gallup.

“The shift is most pronounced among young adults, indicating the trend is likely to accelerate in the years ahead,” according to the report. “Americans in all age groups still largely accept the Bible as a holy document, but most of these downplay God’s direct role in it.”