EVA SOMMERS | Courtesy Photo

Business summit comes to campus

EVA SOMMERS | Courtesy Photo

EVA SOMMERS | Courtesy Photo

The College of Business and Communication is holding the Power to Excel summit May 28.

Students have been invited to attend the college summit titled The Power to Excel, Achieving Excellence through Understanding Data.

“Once a year or so, the college provides a summit, which is a conference where we bring in outside speakers to impart their wisdom and share some of their experiences with the students,” said Kirk Gifford, dean of the of the College of Business and Communication.

The summit will be held in the John Taylor Building on Thursday from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Admission is free.

“Typically, we bring in four or five individuals from all sorts of different areas so that they represent the college,” Gifford said.

The four guest speakers are Travis Bush, a manager in Tax Technology & Data Analytics at Ernst & Young; Brandon Hawkes, a data warehouse engineer; Cliff Higbee, the director of member and statistical records for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; and Keith Nellesen, the co-founder of Vivint, according to the college’s Web page.

“We’re bringing in individuals from a variety of different areas and walks of life,” Gifford said. “The common focus is on using data to make decisions in the workplace.”

Gifford said there is a good mix of speakers and it will be applicable to more students than just those studying business.

Gifford said there will be a luncheon for interested students and faculty. President Gilbert will be there to greet those attending and share some of his experiences with business analytics and big data.

“We encourage students to come,” Gifford said. “We’ve asked faculty to cancel their classes so that students will be free to come.”

Gifford said there will be opportunities for students to talk to professionals in the industries they are interested in and ask them questions.

Gifford said students should come prepared with questions.

“Just come prepared to learn,” Gifford said. “Come to learn something about what’s going on in the world and how that may impact you, your job and your future.”

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