The difference between ISIS and ISIL (Chris Goyette, Scroll Illustraion)

Dare to explore, refuse to be terrorized

The Atatürk airport in Turkey was bombed last Thursday by possible ISIL terrorists.

Forty-four people are dead, including a small child, over a hundred were injured, according to CNN.

Berkay Altinok, assistant to Turkish Press Counselor Fatih OKE of the Turkish Embassy in Washington D.C., said he had a friend that was at the airport just before the bombing happened.

“She was there fifteen minutes before the bombing,” Altinok said. “I could’ve been there, you could’ve been there, anyone could’ve been there.”

The Turkish press office believes ISIL was behind the attack due to the similarities between what happened in Istanbul and other attacks that have happen in the past year in Turkey, according to an email sent from the Turkish press office.

“No terror group has taken responsibility for the attack, in which three men arrived by taxi at the international terminal and launched their horror, armed with rifles and suicide bomb vests,” according to CNN.

The purpose of terrorism is to strike fear in the heart of the public, and the recent attacks on Turkey have been carried out because ISIL wishes to harm Turkey’s economy by harming their tourist revenue, according to an email sent from the Turkish press office.

“They targeted Turkey because they know that Turkey’s fight with terrorism is one of the most important barriers for them and they have to overcome this,” according to an email sent from the Turkish press office. “Turkey’s tourism industry is highly crucial, and they want to damage this. Also, creating chaos and fear would serve for terrorism.”

The Turkish press office encouraged students to become familiar with other cultures, according to their email.

“Students are a future of a nation, and they are the future journalists, diplomats, doctors, engineers, politicians, experts in all fields,” according to an email sent from the Turkish press office. “Our message will be, ‘Don’t let any fear get to you, and travel. Travel the world and explore. That’s the best way to get to know a culture, a country, a person and realities.’”

Altinok said he recalls when he came to the U.S. in 2006.

“I was an 18-year-old student; I worked at national parks and had met with lots of great people from all over the USA and all over the world, and that’s made me know different cultures, people and made me who I am,” Altinok said.

America and Turkey have been allies since the 1950s and remain fervent allies against terrorism, according to an email sent from the Turkish press office.

“We all only have one world, and it belongs to all of us,” according to an email from the Turkish press office. “For that reason, we should all, as a humanity, stand shoulder to shoulder and united. This is our civilization.”

Turkish people in the U.S. grieve over the loss that happened in San Bernardino, Orlando, Paris, Belgium and other victims of ISIL’s heinous crimes, according to an email sent from the Turkish press office.

Between June 5, 2015, and Jun 28, 2016, there have been 14 attacks on Turkish soil, according to The New York Times.

From those attacks, 285 people have died, according to The New York Times.

“The Islamic State has never claimed responsibility for any attacks in Turkey, but government officials have now linked the group to at least five bombings,” according to The New York Times.

From July 16, 2015, to June 13, 2016, there have been three attacks on American soil, and of those attacks, 68 people died, according to the Religion of Peace website.

Istanbul is number four in the world as the most-visited city in the world, with an estimated 12.56 million visitors per year, according to the Annual MasterCard Global Destinations Cities Index released on June 3.

“ISIL in Turkey mostly targeted Turkey’s tourism hubs,” according to an email sent from the Turkish press office.

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Copyright 2015 BYU-I Scroll