BYU-Idaho Professor Explains Impact of Gravity Waves

Story by Ryan Brennan

A gravity wave is a ripple in the curvature of the space-time continuum. It is a combination of three perceived physical dimensions and created by the movement of matter.

Gravity waves are predicted by the general theory of relativity created by Albert Einstein, even though he predicted otherwise.

“People now believe that Einstein’s theory of relativity is an accurate description of the way things work,” said Jon Johnson, a physics professor at BYU-Idaho.

The discovery came after scientists found the culprit: black holes.

“Two black holes orbiting one another, equivalent to 30 suns compacted to a small space, then merge together creating a gravity wave,” Johnson said.

The large gravity wave can be found on computer simulations and surprisingly its very accurate to what some modern day scientists predicted.

New technological advantages have made it possible to observe scientific data. After 100 years, Einstein’s theory of relativity continues to be confirmed by scientific discovery.

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