Health and Wellness up, BMI down

This story was written by Dallin Watkins

In the Wellness Center on campus, students have access to a variety of activities that can improve one’s health and wellness. Fit for Life is one of many options accessible to students at BYU-Idaho.

The Wellness Center and the Fit for Life consultation desk can be found in the John W. Hart Building Exercise Gym 152.

Wellness is achieved when needs of the individual are met. These needs can be classified in six different dimensions of wellness: occupational, physical, social, intellectual, spiritual and emotional.

These dimensions and definitions can be found in many places, but they are specifically located on the Web page of the National Wellness Institute. Dr. Bill Hettler, co-founder of the NWI, developed the dimensions.

A team on campus is dedicated to helping students learn about and satisfy some of these dimensions in the Wellness Center.

The center offers a wide range of tests and programs designed to help students achieve their wellness goals and attain greater physical wellness.

One specific test is called the InBody Analysis. It measures body fat percentage, total body water and basal metabolic rate.

“It can even detect if you are right or left-handed,” said Lindsey Staley, director of the Wellness Center and senior studying health science.

Additionally, the Wellness Center offers nutritional analysis, anthropomorphic measurements (width, height, etc.) and a variety of different body composition tests and other fitness analysis.

Last semester alone, the Wellness Center performed roughly 9,000 tests and helped many students reach their fitness and wellness goals.

The Wellness Center offers three different programs for physical fitness and wellness: Fit for Life, Biggest Winner and Learn.Eat.Live.

Fit for Life is a personal training service offering personalized workouts, one-on-one time with a personal trainer and weekly nutrition appointments for just $25 each semester.

The Fit for Life program is designed to help students, their spouses and faculty members reach their fitness goals, regardless of age or current fitness level, according to the Wellness Center section on the Student Activities Web page.

Biggest Winner is similar to Fit for Life, but it is specifically tailored to those with a body fat percentage greater than 25 percent. More information on the Biggest Winner and Learn.Eat.Live can be found on the Wellness Center section of the Student Activities Web page.

Additional information regarding wellness options and services on campus can be found on the Student Activities Web page. Students can also visit the Wellness Center and begin working with student professionals toward reaching their physical wellness and fitness goals.

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