High school proposed for Kenya orphans

Orphans in Kenya walk along dirt roads, gather at school, and share a meal together. BYU-Idaho alumnus Preston Lindsay has organized some  students at Madison Middle School to raise funds to build a high school for AIDS orphans in Kenya.

Orphans in Kenya walk along dirt roads, gather at school, and share a meal together. BYU-Idaho alumnus Preston Lindsay has organized some
students at Madison Middle School to raise funds to build a high school for AIDS orphans in Kenya.

A BYU-Idaho alumnus is leading a project to build a high school for 1,000 orphaned students in Kenya.

Preston Lindsay, an instructor for the After School Program, is leading some of the students at Madison Middle School in what has been dubbed as The Kenya Project.

The students named themselves Team Hope. In order for their vision to become a reality they will need to raise a total of $95,000 to purchase the land and build the high school.

“We’re trying to sustainably change social problems so people can be taken care of at a fundamental level,” Lindsay said.

The organization in charge of The Kenya Project is called Tucklets, a non-profit organization based in San Diego.

Lindsay is teaming up with CEO of Tucklets Kathleen Tucker to oversee the care of 1,000 children living in Kakamega, Kenya.

All the children have lost their parents to AIDS.

Lindsay and Tucker are working to ensure the safety of the children, provide food, build a high school and make the community more self-reliant.

“I want people to be taken care of, especially orphan kids,” Lindsay said. “They’ve lost their parents, they have no food … It’s not ok.”

Lindsay said he wants to bring the Rexburg community closer through The Kenya Project.

“I love Rexburg, and I love the people here; so many good people. I just want us all to come together and help these kids out,” Lindsay said.

Lindsay said that one of the girls in the community of Kakamega is aspiring to be an aviation engineer. Another boy wants to be a brain surgeon. Lindsay said many of the children have to walk a couple hours in to attend school.

“They’ll sleep on dirt floors; they’ll study hours into the night because school goes from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., mostly for safety purposes. There are lots of kidnappings, lots of rape,” Lindsay said.

Lindsay said taking care of the children of Kakamega is something that needs to be done, and he is up to the task.

Team Hope is planning events to raise the money needed, including a garage sale, a Walk-A-Thon and a capstone event. Donations for the garage sale are being accepted at Madison Middle School.

Members of the community can participate by sponsoring a student in the Walk-A-Thon, which will take place at the middle school.

The final capstone event will be held at The Atrium, featuring a dinner and auction.

BYU-Idaho Bookstore will donate artwork to be sold at the action. Art created by the students of Kakamega will also be up for sale.

Lindsay graduated from BYU-I in 2010 with a degree in education.

He is now the father of three children, enrolled in the master’s program at Pepperdine University, and working as an instructor for the After School Program at Madison Middle School.

Despite his schedule, Lindsay said these kids are more important than his free time and spends his own personal time to organize and execute tasks required to complete The Kenya Project.

“The kids are amazing, both the kids helping and the kids in Africa,” Lindsay said.

Lindsay asked that the community of Rexburg give generously to the donation boxes that will be placed in various locations around Rexburg.

All proceeds are going to the improvement of the lives of children of in Kakamega, Kenya.

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