Bingham Memorial Hospital in Blackfoot, Idaho, is 1 of 10 hospitals worldwide to unveil a new cancer spotting technology called Cellvizio, which uses the smallest microscope in the world, according to the Bingham Memorial Hospital’s Health News Web page.

This new endomicroscopy technology is expected to detect the early stages of cancer by allowing doctors using Cellvizio to see particular cells during endoscopies, according to the hospital’s Web page.                                          

Mackenzie Mayberry, a senior studying elementary education, said she is excited to see the technology span across the nation and branch out to detect early signs of other types  of cancer.

“It’s so cool to think that it’s so close to us in Idaho,” Mayberry said. “I always hear about new technology rising in hospitals here and there, but usually they’re so far away. So, to think that Bingham Memorial in Blackfoot is doing something so advanced with cancer research is pretty awesome.”                

Mayberry said her 16-year-old cousin is battling cancer.

“It’s a long battle for him because they didn’t catch it early, and I know that when doctors are able to catch it early, the patient has a much larger survival rate,” Mayberry said.

Cellvizio works mainly to detect cancerous cells that rise in the esophagus due to acid reflux disease, according to the hospital’s Web page. Doctors at Bingham Memorial Hospital are working with patients who develop Barrett’s Esophagus, a complication that stems from acid reflux, according to the hospital’s Web page.   

The probe of the microscope works to magnify cells 1,000 times more than a regular endoscope, so the doctors can see exactly what is going on inside the patient’s esophagus, according to the hospital’s Web page.

When the patient’s biopsy comes back, the doctor can then use the technology to terminate the cancer, according to the hospital’s Web page.

Mayberry said she is impressed that Bingham Memorial Hospital was one of the first hospitals in the nation to unveil Cellvizio.

While Bingham Memorial is the only city east of Seattle using Cellvizio, the University of Washington Medical Center had a test run with the microscope in 2009. While they are not one of the 10 hospitals included in the technological trial, they mapped successes with Cellvizio, according to the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.  Mayberry said her cousin had to be moved from eastern washington to Seattle in order to treat his leukemia. He was already past the first stages of his cancer.

“He just had to have a bone marrow transplant,” Mayberry said. “It’s hard because when you are young, you don’t think that this would ever happen to you.”

Mayberry said, by the time her cousins’ cancer was detected, he needed four blood transfusions the same night he was admitted into the hospital.

“Early detection is really the only way to prevent all types of cancer,”  Mayberry said.

Mayberry said, by the time her cousins’ cancer was detected, he needed four blood transfusions the same night he was admitted into the hospital.

“Early detection is really the only way to prevent all types of cancer,” Mayberry said.