natural remedy or artificail

Natural or artificial: which is better?


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Stacey DeCelle, a senior studying health science, said she is a major advocate for western medicine, especially vaccinations.

“I believe that we are given medicine to help us,” DeCelle said.

DeCelle said she believes essential oils act as a placebo, causing someone to believe the oils benefit them.

“I think the essential oils carry a placebo effect,” DeCelle said. “It’s mind over matter.”

DeCelle said that, in reality, they cannot cure serious ailments.

“Some herbal products may be used to treat minor conditions and illnesses (e.g., coughs, colds, stomach upset) in much the same way that conventional FDA-approved, OTC nonprescription drugs are used,” according to the textbook.

Greg Klingler, a physician’s assistant and a professor in the Department of Health, Recreation and Human Performance, said he views natural remedies as complementary therapy; they can sustain and assist good health, but they cannot cure poor health.

“If people are sick, complementary therapies oftentimes do not provide everything that we need to restore health,” Klingler said. “I would utilize a western medicine therapy, for example: antibiotics, medications, surgeries, or chemotherapies. Then we could use things like essential oils, herbal remedies, massage to help supplement more tried and true treatments.”

Klingler said that while both remedies contain beneficial factors, there are side effects to both remedies of which patients need to be cautious.

“The problem with some complementary therapies is that oftentimes, there is not someone to educate the patient to the potential outcomes and potential side effects,” Klingler said.

DeCelle said she had an experience where her roommate who used essential oils was in the hospital and learned that essential oils may also have a negative affect on the body.

“Essential oils cause damage to your liver,” DeCelle said. “It corrodes your liver enzymes.”

Klingler said he encourages thorough research when considering any form of medication.

“If they have done their homework, if they have determined it is safe and if it is therapeutic to them, then I’ll encourage them to keep going,” Klingler said. “However, I would caution any patient about some illnesses and conditions that cannot be entirely treated or corrected using alternative therapies alone.”

Klingler said he would suggest merging the best of both remedies.

“Let’s utilize good, sound acupuncture, hypnotherapy, echinacea or herbal remedies, but let’s use that in conjunction with the best that western medicine has to offer, surgeries and medications,” Klingler said.



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