An umbrella of hope, held up by two interlocking hands, resembling the shape of a heart, encircled by the words No More Bad Days sits proudly on the chest of Christian Anderson, a junior majoring in international studies.

With a smile on his face that looks like it might crack the skin on his cheeks, he talks about the nonprofit group he co-founded, and an upcoming end-of-semester concert he booked to spread awareness about depression.

The depression awareness show will be held July 8 at The Basement.

“We have some really cool punk bands coming out,” Anderson said.

The concert will feature performances from Boise musicians Rob Lanterman and Young, Planetary as well as various local bands like Vic Fox, The Howls, Poor Sports and Second Chance.

“When we first started No More Bad Days, I knew there were a lot of people that needed some place where they would feel comfortable. So we centered the project around music.”

Christian Anderson

a junior majoring in international studies

“When we first started No More Bad Days, I knew there were a lot of people that needed some place where they would feel comfortable,” Anderson said. “So we centered the project around music.“

Because of his personal experiences overcoming hurdles caused by depression and anxiety, he said he founded the nonprofit group in 2015 and has worked to provide help.

“No More Bad Days has been going for almost a year now,” Anderson said. “We just wanted it to be a safe place for people to come and talk about things that are bothering them; like AA, but for depression.”

Michael Menendez, co-founder of No More Bad Days, said the support group originally met once a week to discuss self-worth through mediums like music, art and poetry slams.

Anderson said the group meets less frequently now, but still offers support through regular events like the upcoming awareness show.

“It’s hard to get the word out,” Anderson said. “That’s one of the reasons why we’ve decided to have this punk show.”

He said they have tried traditional methods of promotion like putting up fliers and approaching people on campus, but the university asked them to stop.

“You say the word ‘punk’ around here and people kind of freak out,” Anderson said.

He said they have been forced to find creative ways to promote their cause.

“We made t-shirts that said ‘No More Bad Days’ on the front and, ‘Music saved my life,’ on the back,” Anderson said. “We used to stand outside of The Burg on Tuesdays after devotional and give free hugs.”

“You say the word ‘punk’ around here and people kind of freak out.”

Christian Anderson

a junior majoring in international studies

Anderson said he hopes awareness concerts, like the one on July 8, will be a successful way for the group to reach more students.

“Coming up with the idea is easy,” Anderson said. “But finding ways to tell people about it is really hard.”