Brad Pelo speaking at the Innovation Summit (Brooks McFadden, Scroll Photography)

Summit guides innovation

Mike Murray, Brad Pelo and Taylor Randall, three well-known businessmen, visited BYU-Idaho to encourage career success at the Innovation Summit for the College of Business and Communication.

Brad Pelo said BYU-I students should have a dream and believe in it after speaking at the Innovation Summit on June 9.

Pelo is an entrepreneur and movie producer, according to the Innovation Summit program.

Pelo said the world outside of college is not at all like the school setting.

“There won’t be instructions for the classroom,” said Pelo.

Not everyone in the workplace will share your standards, according to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints website.

“Choose to work with people who you enjoy to be around,” Pelo said.

Pelo said age makes no difference in success.

“When I was fifteen years old, I realized I wanted to be an entrepreneur,” Pelo said.

Pelo said he created tour videos of his home to help realtors sell his parents’ house to lift the stress off of their shoulders. Because he was young, people were impressed by his innovation and told others about it.

“From that moment on, I realized that whatever I dreamt about, I could do,” Pelo said. “It didn’t matter my age; it didn’t matter what restraints there were.”

Pelo said college students should know they can do everything they set their minds to, if they learn what they need to do.

“What can we be learning that we’re not learning?” Pelo said.

Pelo said there is always more to learn than what people are assigned to learn, and college students should absorb a wide variety of knowledge in different areas.

“Consider, what it is in your life that you might be busy pursuing that might not be the best fit for you,” Pelo said. “When I knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur, it changed everything about my life.”

Matthew Quick, a senior studying communication, said Pelo was insightful and he got a lot more out of Pelo’s presentation than he originally expected to.

“The thing that struck me the most was him asking the audience, ‘What can we be learning that we’re not learning?,” Quick said. “When he said that, I realized I should learn about things that interest me.”

Quick said he thought it was inspiring how Pelo told the audience to have a vision of what they want to pursue, and to believe in that vision.

“We’re taught that we need to stay within the realms of what we’re studying, but that is not actually the case,” Quick said. “In my own life, I’ve seen things I would’ve never imagined being a possibility fall together perfectly.”

Quick said people can miss great opportunities when they assume they cannot achieve their goals.

“We are allowed and encouraged to take problems to other people to see what other solutions we can come up with,” Quick said. “So many times we see people struggling by themselves to fix whatever problem it is, when in all actuality, we can always seek for help in solving these issues.”

Pelo said college students should know how to collaborate with one another to solve problems, rather than always choosing to resolve issues alone.

“On your journey, remember that we are here for each other, we are here for our families and we are here for other purposes,” Pelo said.

Pelo said that the most important thing for all striving college students to remember is that people are here to bless each other.

“We should use our careers to bless the lives of others,” Pelo said. “Be led by the compass of the spirit in all that you do, and make the kingdom of God your first priority in this life.”

Copyright 2015 BYU-I Scroll