Time management: finding success in class

 According to the Oregon Department of Human Services, the average person uses 13 different methods to control and manage their time. In addition, 20 percent of the average workday is spent on “crucial” and “important” things, while 80 percent of the average workday is spent on things that have “little value” or “no value.” SHAIN WIEDERHOLT | Photo Illustration

According to the Oregon Department of Human Services, the average person uses 13 different methods to control and manage their time. In addition, 20 percent of the average workday is spent on “crucial” and “important” things, while 80 percent of the average workday is spent on things that have “little value” or “no value.” SHAIN WIEDERHOLT | Photo Illustration

School can be a stressful time for students, but implementing simple time management tips and using resources that BYU-Idaho has to offer can help many people find success in their classes.

“I treat school like a full-time job,” said Anna Tambasco, a sophomore studying exercise physiology. “I spend about  seven hours a day going to classes and doing homework. It helps me stay prepared and on top of assignments.”

This approach can also help other students prepare for the work environment.

“In my off-track, I run two small businesses,” said Kyle Hanson, a junior studying business management. “Keeping busy during the semester helps me stay productive during my off-track and vice-versa.”

BYU-I offers several free resources  to help students achieve academic success.

Tutoring services are provided to students in many different subjects, with specific tutoring centers devoted to math, public speaking and presentations, study skills, and writing. Tutoring for any other subject is available at the general tutoring center. The tutoring center also has a study-skills assessment that can be taken online.

This assessment informs students of the weak points in their time-management skills and assesses a student’s physical, spiritual and academic preparedness to succeed in his or her classes. ssHowever, many people also recommend making sure to relax and decompress.

“Too much stress can derail your attempts at getting organized,” according to the Mayo Clinic website. “When you need a break, take one.”

Amit Sood, a physician with the Mayo Clinic, said that multitasking damages productivity.

“Start by turning off the TV, putting down your phone and logging out of e-mail,” Sood said. “Eliminate non-critical screen time for two days and see how much more you get done.”

Tambasco agrees.

“When I’m at school, I’m at school,” she said. “I avoid Facebook and wasting time. But when I’m relaxing, I relax just as hard as I work.”

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