Time management

Natalie Fisher Art Sophomore

There are many ways to simplify one’s life, according to Becoming Minimalist, a website devoted to helping people follow their dreams by letting go of materialistic items. One can simplify his or her life by reducing the constant stream of interaction he or she may face, reducing the act of multitasking and devoting time towards what matters.
Skyler Wixom, a senior studying English, said that once a student gets on YouTube or Facebook, they tend to become absorbed in the chain of links, memes and videos. He said that social media is a major time guzzler.
“I waste a lot of time probably watching shows on Netflix and being on social media,” said Kara Masters, a sophomore studying nursing. “Probably three to four hours a day, I waste time doing nothing. If I limited the time, it would be way better.”
Andrea Moon, a sophomore studying family and consumer science education comp, said social media is not the only vice for time consumption. Moon said spending time interacting with her boyfriend and roommates has proven to be her biggest distraction.
“You have to balance sleep,” Masters said. “You have to balance school. You have to balance church activities, social activities. You have to find time to eat and do homework. You can’t do all of them without some of them suffering.”
Masters said that balancing everything is difficult, and that her social life often suffers dramatically for the sake of school.
“I think we need to be trained more on how to manage time,” Moon said.
Wixom said it is easy to forget about homework when students get caught up in hobbies, but if students prioritized, their lives would be more simplistic.
“Set restrictions for yourself,” Masters said. “Say, ‘After I finish homework, I can watch one episode of this show on Netflix,’ or ‘After I finish this assignment, then I can check Facebook and Instagram.’”
Masters said students should provide themselves a reward system.
“When I have a day full of homework assignments, I make a list of what those assignments are that need to be done that day,” Wixom said. “Then after I finish, those I try to just work ahead as much as possible.”
Simplifying one’s life will reduce the anxieties that come from his or her day-to-day experiences and duties, according to an article by L. Tom Perry titled, “Let Him Do It with Simplicity.”
“In our search to obtain relief from the stresses of life, may we earnestly seek ways to simplify our lives,” according to the article.
Wixom said said students should create time blocks that allow a set time to finish all of the assignments needed to be done that day.
“Space it throughout the day,” Wixom said. “It depends on what your schedule is like, but you have to block it out or else it’s not going to get done.”
Moon said she does not always manage her time well, but each day before class, she tries to create a list of things she needs to get done each day.
Moon said life is unpredictable and students may have to deviate from their plans. She said when this is the case, students should create a backup plan to keep the little things from being forgotten.
“I’m focusing on schoolwork, dating, and other social relationships and just free time,” Wixom said. “If I just leave that up to chance, my life’s going to seem chaotic, but if I prioritize and do the stuff that needs to get done first, then I can focus on social stuff and then focus on me time. Then life becomes  really simple.”

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