(Chris Goyette)

Voters dissatisfied with presidential candidates

A growing number of voters disapprove of the current presidential candidates.

In a recent study, The Pew Research Center found that 67 percent of voters disapprove of the current presidential candidates.

“This marks the first time in six presidential contests since 1992 that positive views of the choice of candidates have shown a significant decline over the course of the campaign,” according to the Pew Research Center.

Matt Miles, faculty in the political science department, said the dissatisfaction with Hillary Clinton has been common throughout her political career, and Donald Trump has had a highly unfavorable rating since he announced his candidacy.

“No matter who wins, almost two-thirds of Americans will be unhappy with them,” Miles said.

Scroll reported that LDS voters who identify as Republicans have been leaving the Republican Party and now identify as independents.

Miles said this trend has been happening for the last 15 to 20 years in both parties and is not unique to LDS voters.

“People are leaving both parties,” Miles said. “They’re leaving the Republican Party and the Democrat Party and self-identifying as independent, but they’re not becoming more moderate in their ideology.”

He does not believe this exodus from the two major parties will have any effect on the future of third-party candidates.

“The problem for third-party candidates is that the electoral college creates a structure where it’s a winner-take-all vote,” Miles said. “So, whoever gets the highest percentage of the vote in the state wins all of the electoral college votes in that state, with the exception of Nebraska and Maine.”

In other words, third-party candidates would have to persuade the majority of voters in the majority of states to be able to win the presidency.

But, some third-party candidates like independent candidate Evan McMullin say there is a way for a third-party candidate to win without winning the majority of electoral votes.

“The goal is to prevent either major-party candidate from reaching 270 electoral votes and send the election to the House of Representatives. In order to achieve this, we must win some electoral votes and show the country, and the House, that there is a desire for a compromise candidate,” according to a blog post published on McMullin’s campaign website.

Miles said the only way for a third-party candidate to win is to get rid of the electoral college.

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