A new report from the Idaho Board of Education states that 63% of graduates from Idaho’s public colleges and universities were employed in Idaho.

Researchers evaluated how likely different types of students were to remain employed in Idaho following graduation. Categories included:

— Resident and non-resident graduates. 

— Graduates from two-year institutions and four-year institutions.

— Type of degree earned (associate, bachelor, master, doctorate).

— Institution graduated from.

Report highlights

The study measured the Employed-in-Idaho Rate as the main unit of measurement. It considers a graduate employed if the person earned at least half-time wages at the minimum wage.

The biggest gap in the EIR occurred when examining whether the student was an Idaho resident or not. 

Idaho residents are more likely to remain employed in Idaho. Image credit: Idaho Board of Education.
Idaho residents are more likely to remain employed in Idaho. Image credit: Idaho Board of Education.

While resident status seems to have the most significant impact on the EIR of graduates, many other factors, such as types of degrees, affected whether graduates became employed in Idaho. 

For example, those who graduated with degrees in the health sector are among those who are most likely to have jobs in Idaho. Engineering and liberal arts majors are less likely to be employed in Idaho.

On average, two year colleges have higher Employed-in-Idaho Rates. Image credit: Idaho Board of Education.
On average, two year colleges have higher Employed-in-Idaho Rates. Image credit: Idaho Board of Education.

“There are also differences in the Employed-in-Idaho Rate across the postsecondary institutions,” State Board Chief Research Officer Dr. Cathleen McHugh said. “Differences in graduates’ choices of degrees or majors only explain some of these differences across institutions. It is likely that factors such as geographical location and the mobility of the student population served also drive the difference in EIR.”

People interested in exploring the data more can visit the interactive dashboard prepared by the Board. 

“We want to make it easier for Idahoans to take an active role in data exploration and be able to use the data to answer their specific questions,” said Briana Krebs, the Board’s research and communication specialist and developer of the interactive dashboard.