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Navigating campus can be daunting your first semester. Here is a list of all the academic buildings on campus and what they contain.

Eliza R. Snow Building (SNO)

This building is located on the north end of campus. Named after the second president of the Relief Society, it is the only building named after a woman. It’s home to the Snow Drama Theater, the Black Box Theater and the Barrus Concert Hall. The Departments of Dance, Theatre and Music offices are located in this building. Fun fact: Each group practice room door weighs 400 pounds to reduce sound outside the practice room.

Jacob Spori Building (SPO)

This building is located on the north end of campus. Named after the first president of the school, this was the first building on campus. The Jacob Spori Art Gallery, located on the first floor, has art exhibits throughout the year. The Departments of Communication and Art offices are located in this building. Fun fact: The original building burned down in 2000 during demolition. Original woodwork and stones can be found on the third floor.

Oscar A. Kirkham Building (KRK)

This building is located on the north end of campus. Named after the General Authority Seventy whose first job was teaching at Ricks College, it is home to the Kirkham Auditorium, which has seen many famous speakers, including First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. This building will be torn down due to noncompliance with the American Disabilities Act in the following months. Fun Fact: This building was used as a clothing and bedding distribution center throughout the summer of the 1976 Teton Dam failure.

George S. Romney Building (ROM)

This building is located on the north end of campus. It was named after the seventh president of the school. It is home to an observatory and a natural science museum. The Departments of Chemistry, Geology and Physics offices are located in this building. Fun fact: A portrait of George Romney, done by Del Parson, can be found in the lobby of the building.

John L. Clarke Building (CLK)

This building is located on the north end of campus. Named after the ninth president of the school, the building was remodeled in 2006. It has several labs including the Child Lab and the simulation rooms for nursing students. The Departments of Nursing, Health Services and Home and Family offices are in this building. Fun Fact: In the Summer of 1979, a design laboratory was built. The rooms in the lab simulate a home where students do actual interior design work.

Joseph Fielding Smith Building (SMI)

This building is located on the north end of campus on the east side. It is named after the 10th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This building is home to the Presentation Practice Center, the Economics Tutor Lab, the Accounting Tutor Lab and the foreign language conversation labs. The Departments of Accounting, Business Management, Economics, and Languages and International Studies offices are in this building. Fun fact: As of summer 1982, there were only six to eight micro computers installed in its “computer room.”

John W. Hart Building (HRT)

This building is located on the north end of campus on the west side. Named after the Idaho state legislator who in the 1930s appealed to keep the school open, it is the home of the BYU-Idaho Fitness Center, an auditorium, racquetball, basketball and volleyball courts and a swimming pool. It also has the Wellness Center which sponsors a program called Fit4Life. The Department of Human Performance and Recreation offices are located in this building. Fun Fact: A new organ, valued at $90,000, was donated by an anonymous Utah couple in April 1993.

BYU-Idaho Center (BCRT)

This building is located on the north end of campus on the west side. Dedicated in 2010, it was built for the purpose of gathering the student body for spiritual education. The building holds a 15,000-seat auditorium modeled after the Conference Center in Salt Lake City. This is where the weekly devotionals are held. It also contains 10 multi-purpose courts and an indoor track. Fun fact: The building has 25,500 yards of concrete, enough to build a sidewalk 6 feet wide and 70 miles long.

David O. McKay Library (MCK)

This building is located on the north end of campus near the center. It was named after the ninth president of The Church. The library has two wings and three floors. On the first floor, there is the main circulation desk, the Mac Lab and group study areas. On the second floor, there is the quiet section, Special Collections, the Grand Acorn Press and the tutoring centers. On the third floor, there are more group study areas, technology services, volunteer connections and the sky bridge that connects to the Manwaring Center. Fun fact: Originally an administration building, it was remodeled around 1970 and five times after that.

Hyrum Manwaring Center (MC)

This building is located in the center of campus. Named after the eighth president who led the college through the Great Depression and WWII, this building has three floors. On the first floor, there is the University Store, the Student Activities offices, the Print Shop, the bowling alley, the Alumni office, the Career Networking services, the internship office and the Testing Center. On the second floor there is The Crossroads food court, the lost and found, and the Grand Ballroom. This level has the sky bridge connection to the third floor of the library. On the third floor, there is the Little Theater, the Special Events room and Administrative Office. Fun fact: The Manwaring Center originally included a post office and barbershop.

John Taylor Building (TAY)

This building is located in the center of campus. It is named after the third president of the Church. This building is the center for religious education on campus. The auditorium holds the Rogers Pipe Electronic Combination which was specially designed for the room. The Department of Religious Education and Humanities offices are located in this building. Fun fact: The unique shape of the building represents the steps taken on the road toward an upward progression.

Spencer W. Kimball Building (KIM)

This building is located in the center of campus on the east side. Named after the 12th president of the Church, it is the main administration building. It is home to the executive offices, the financial aid office, the student Honor Code office and the Title IX office. If you are hired for an on-campus job, you will have to go to this building to be put in the system. Fun fact: A commissioned portrait of President Kimball by Ricks alumnus Gregg Thorkelson of St. Anthony, Idaho, was unveiled at the dedication.

Ezra Taft Benson Building (BEN)

This building is located on the south side of campus. It is named for the 13th president of The Church, who was also the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture under President Dwight D. Eisenhower. This building has several greenhouses, the Plant Shop, the bloom room, a taxonomy exhibit and the cadaver lab. The Department of Biology office is located in this building. Fun fact: The ground was broken Sept. 27, 1977, by Elder R. Jeffrey R. Holland, then Church commissioner of education.

Mark Austin Building (AUS)

This building is located on the south side of campus on the west end. It was named after a well-known philanthropist and humanitarian who served as chairman on the board of Ricks College. This building is home to various workshops including the Design and Construction, Mechanical and Civil Engineering and automotive offices are located in this building. Fun fact: The statue in front of the building, called Boy in Flight, captures the spirit invention and exploration.

Science and Technology Center (STC)

This building is located on the south side of campus on the west end. One of the newest building on campus, it was completed in 2016. This building was created in response to the growing student population which was 34,232 both online and on campus as of Winter 2018. The Department of Animal and Food Science, Applied Plant Science, Computer Information Technology and Computer Science and Electrical Engineering offices are located in this building. Fun fact: It is campus’ most energy-efficient building.

Thomas E. Ricks Building (RKS)

This building is located on the south side of campus. This building is named after the founder of the school. It is home to several animal test labs where animals such as rats and chicken are tested to discover new treatments or isolate certain molecules. The Departments of Psychology, Sociology and Social Work, History, Geography, and Political Science, and math offices are located in this building. Fun fact: This building is sandwiched between the Ricks Gardens and the Apple Orchard.

Gordon B. Hinkley Building (HIN)

This building is located on the south side of campus on the east end. Named after the 15th president of the Church, he announced that the university would become a four-year university and have the name changed to BYU-Idaho. This building includes a gymnasium and a chapel for various church events, including institute. The Department of Teacher Education offices is in this building. Fun fact: The Hinckley building is similar to the Institute Building at the University of Utah.

Rigby and Biddulph Halls (RIG, BID)

These buildings are located on the north side of campus on the west end. The William F. Rigby Building, or Rigby Hall, is home to various teacher offices, the ROTC and the Student Support offices. The Department of English is located in this building. The Lowell G. Biddulph Building, or Biddulph Hall, is home to various auxiliary offices such as online learning. Fun Fact: These buildings were former dormitories for men.

Chapman and Lamprecht Halls (CHA, LAM)

These buildings are located on the north side of campus on the east end. Chapman Hall is home to home to the academic advising offices for every college. The Lamprecht Hall is home to various auxiliary offices. Fun Fact: These buildings were former dormitories for women.

Student Health and Counseling Center and University Communication Building (SHC, UCB)

These buildings are located on the south side of campus on the east end. The Student Health and Counseling Center is where students can go if they have health issues or need therapy. These centers require the students to have their I-Card present to set up an appointment. The University Communication Building houses the BYU-Idaho radio station. Fun fact: the University Communication Building was dedicated by David A. Bednar in 2001.

Now you can navigate BYU-Idaho’s campus with ease.


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