The moon, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn will align in the morning sky throughout the month of June.

There are a few chances to see planets with the naked eye this month, according to Preston Dyches, a public engagement specialist for NASA.

Several articles claimed six planets would be visible without equipment, but Dyches disproved those reports. Only three of the six can be seen without the help of telescopes or other magnification tools.

These celestial bodies were first visible during the early morning on June 2.

“In the hour before sunrise, reddish Mars hangs beneath the crescent Moon,” Dyches said, speaking of the scene that lit the sky that morning.

On June 3, Saturn was more visible.

“Saturn, the first planet to rise during the night, is below the horizon until around 2:30 a.m.,” said Matthew Overton, one of the BYU-Idaho observatory operators. He encouraged viewers to look to the eastern sky to see Mars and Saturn.

The campus observatory will not be open in the early morning to view the planets because the George S. Romney Building will be closed then.

“I would love if we could do something for the planet parade. Although the planets will align, the times when the observatory can be open will not,” Overton said.

The Saturnian system: from images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980.

The Saturnian system: from images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980. Photo credit: NASA

To find more information on the observatory and its hours, visit the Facebook page.

Dyches explained that on June 24, Jupiter will emerge from behind the sun and be visible in the early morning. It will create a southern line with its sister planets: Mars and Saturn.

“Then on June 27, look for the Moon with Saturn. The pair rise around midnight, and by dawn, you’ll find them high in the southern sky,” Dyches said.

The pair will be close enough to see through the same binocular field of view. He recommended looking for steady, bright light in the sky to locate the planets.