The American Dog Derby moved due to current weather conditions and melting snow which could continue on the days of the race, Feb. 16 and 17.

On the day of the race, shuttles will be available to bring people from North Fremont High School in Ashton because there is no parking at bear gulch.

The American Dog Derby website said they will continue providing updates about racing conditions.

The Museum of the Henry's Fork stores pictures and history from past races of the derby.

The Museum of the Henry's Fork stores pictures and history from past races of the derby. Photo credit: Rosemary Jones

Anyone can come and watch as the race begins, and the dogs surge forward with energy.

“Dress warm and be ready just to be amazed and astonished,” said John Scafe, the race director for the derby.

Mushers will be racing in honor of Ray Gordon from Wyoming. He passed away in August 2023 after years of active participation in the American Dog Derby.

Kathy Scafe, the wife and assistant director to John Scafe, said she knew Gordon because their family used to host mushers in their homes.

The display of this year's trophy and books about dog sled racing.

The display of this year's trophy and books about dog sled racing. Photo credit: Rosemary Jones

This year, the winner will receive a cash prize and their name will be added to the base of the Ambassador Cup, which stays on display in the Museum of the Henry’s Fork in Ashton. The museum also displays books and artifacts about past races from the American Dog Derby.

There are races for different levels of mushers available on the day of the derby. The longest race in the derby, the Cordingly Race, is about 28 miles a loop. Racers make one loop per day pulled by 10 to 12 dogs.

The smaller race is 22 miles long with teams of six to eight dogs.

Along with these two races, there will also be a chance for children 16 years and younger to join the junior race with their dogs and sleds.

“One of the kids that started out racing here as a junior racer started mushing when she was two,” Kathy Scafe said. “When she turned ten, she’s racing with the big kids now. She races a six-dog team. Her nickname is ‘Hurricane,’ ‘Hurricane Harley.'”

The entrance of the Museum of the Henry's Fork is located in Ashton.

The entrance of the Museum of the Henry's Fork is located in Ashton. Photo credit: Rosemary Jones

Most of the dogs racing are Alaskan or Siberian huskies.

Mike Huntsman owns a Siberian husky named Smokey. Huntsman grew up around the culture of sled racing and dogs.

His father built the sled now on display in the museum, and Huntsman crafted his own miniature sled, which is also showcased in the museum.

Huntsman has a goal to earn enough money to build kennels and get more dogs.

“So, I’ll have a total of five dogs,” Huntsman said. “And then I’m working on getting a sled.”