Home News Building interfaith partnerships at BYU's Religious Freedom Annual Review

Building interfaith partnerships at BYU’s Religious Freedom Annual Review

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is constantly working on ways to build relationships with all other faiths and denominations. So when several church representatives and those from other religions spoke on how they build interfaith relationships, they showed just how simple it can be.

The first two speakers were Reverend Mark Scott from the Azusa Christian Community and Kisha Sogunro of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Together they helped deliver 2,000 turkeys to those in Boston before Thanksgiving. They had only a few weeks to prepare and get everything planned out so that they could get turkeys delivered to those in need. In only a short time, they managed to arrange everything, and a total of 29 organizations from different religions, the government and more got the turkeys and food delivered.

“Friendships and trust are key,” Reverend Scott and Kisha Sogunro said.

They talked more about how they managed to get the whole activity put together and managed to help many within the Boston suburbs.

“If you care about people, you want to address their challenges,” Sogunro said.

The other speakers were Rob Howell of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Alex Shapiro of the United Jewish Federation of Utah. Rather than speak about one event they worked on, they discussed how the two had formed friendships over the past 10 years.

“We shared in each other’s traditions,” Rob Howell said.

Together the two men, along with a few others from their respective organizations, meet each month to discuss different topics of concern throughout the state.

“We came together to form friendships and build trust so that we can discuss both easy and difficult topics,” Alex Shapiro said.

Over the past 10 years, they have discussed and set into action many plans to help both faiths grow stronger and come closer together. Their biggest claim was that this friendship allowed them to come to understandings and collaborate most effectively.

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