Home Features BYU-Idaho students speak on favorite general conference traditions

BYU-Idaho students speak on favorite general conference traditions

Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints look forward to general conference for many reasons. In addition to the messages of hope and inspiration that they receive, conference allows them to spend more time with family.

Although many BYU-Idaho students don’t get the opportunity to go home for conference, most look back fondly upon the traditions with which they grew up.

“My mom puts together general conference bags with each of the 12 apostles’ and the prophet’s pictures on them, so then my siblings can go and pick out the bag for when they talk,” said Brooklynn Nash, a sophomore studying elementary education. “There’ll be, like, cinnamon rolls or a coloring page or different activities or snacks so that they can stay entertained.”

There’s one tradition in particular, that the Nash kids look forward to the most: When the prophet speaks, the cinnamon rolls come out.

Jessie Barrus, a senior studying therapeutic recreation, usually got the opportunity to attend conference in person. Two of her siblings’ birthdays fall at the beginning of October, so the Barrus family typically attends conference on Saturday and then goes out for a birthday dinner afterward.

“And then on Sunday, we eat cinnamon rolls,” Barrus said.

Kayla Moon, a junior studying graphic design, said her family didn’t have any traditions that stood out. Instead, her traditions came from her mission.

Moon, who served in the Utah Provo Mission, participated in a ‘Fantasy Conference’ game. In Fantasy Conference, everyone picks the speakers and songs for each session, among other things. Whoever gets the most items right wins.

But Fantasy Conference was Moon’s second-favorite tradition.

“Everyone made cinnamon rolls,” said Moon.

Christmas isn’t about the decorations and presents, but it would feel strange without them. Conference isn’t about the cinnamon rolls, but it just wouldn’t be the same without them.

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