Home Campus Extreme cooning can save money

Extreme cooning can save money

According to www.today.com, extreme cooning can help people save hundreds of dollars. In fact, cooning practices have increased 63 percent in 2011 and Americans saved approximately $3.7 billion, according to MSN Money.
According to www.today.com, extreme cooning can help people save hundreds of dollars. In fact, cooning practices have increased 63 percent in 2011 and Americans saved approximately $3.7 billion, according to MSN Money.

Forty rolls of toilet paper and 30 bottles of dish soap: $1.09. 100 king size candy bars: $0.00. Clipping coons to get $60 cash back at Walmart: priceless.

Michelle Christensen, a freshman studying business, has been cooning for almost a year, and those were her favorite deals that she received last week by cooning.

Christensen said she went to girl’s camp, and her camp leader was an extreme cooner.

“I thought it was the coolest thing ever. She would pay her babysitters in free stuff, not in cash,” Christensen said.

She said her leader taught her everything she knew, and Christensen got into it.

“I get newspapers on Mondays, and I look at all the inserts, and I look at all the ads, and I look for the best ones, depending on the deal,” Christensen said.

Christensen goes to the Internet in a coon database and look for deals, and there are times when she can make money off of them. According to an online magazine called Shine, “A new survey found 62 percent of shoppers spend to two hours a week searching, scanning and scouting for discounts. Does it pay off? Shoppers say it sure does, and report they saved to $30 each week using coons.”

As a suggestion, Christensen recommends getting hard-copies of coons in the newspaper inserts, because they always have the better deals.

“You can’t [get as] good [of] deal online as you can with the hard copy,” Christensen said.

She said the amount of time she puts into clipping coons pays off.

“I made $60 in cash from buying razors at Walmart, and then at Walgreens [I got] razors for free as well. I have probably 60 men’s razors and 50 women’s razors,” Christensen said.

Paper towels, dish soap, tooth paste, and CoverGirl eye shadow are just a few of the items Christensen has built in her stock pile.

Christensen said she has piles and piles stored in her apartment, and said she loves to give the stuff away and is always looking to help others.

Christensen’s roommates also help sometimes in the cooning process.

“I take my roommates to help me because I can’t carry all the stuff and get all of the things out to my cart. Sometimes people stare at me in the store. It is funny,” Christensen said.

Last week, she went into a store and received 100 king size candy bars for free because of all the coons she had saved.

She said the cashier noticed how Christensen was struggling to handle all of her items.

“They were so heavy. The cashier lady always makes fun of me because I am so clumsy, and I just can’t even get through the store,” Christensen said.

No cooning gros are currently in the Rexburg area, but Christensen said she hopes there will be one in the future.

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