Idaho voters reject Propositions 1, 2, 3

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Three Idaho propositions dealing with education were rejected by many Idaho voters last week. Before the election, the propositions created controversy across Idaho and inspired multiple television ads that sported and opposed the propositions. EMILY RUST | Scroll Illustration
Three Idaho propositions dealing with education were rejected by many Idaho voters last week. Before the election, the propositions created controversy across Idaho and inspired multiple television ads that sported and opposed the propositions. EMILY RUST | Scroll Illustration

Idaho voters rejected educational reforms presented in the form of Propositions 1, 2 and 3 — also known as the Students Come First legislation package — Nov. 6.
The $180 million, 8-year contract between Hewlett-Packard Co. and the state of Idaho, which would have provided every high school student with a laptop computer, will no longer be in effect due to the recent voting down of the propositions.
Serintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna proposed these education laws in 2011. His involvement in these laws inspired their nickname: the Luna laws.
Of the 968 precincts’ votes, according to www.localnews8.com, 57 percent of voters voted against Proposition 1, which dealt with labor relations such as teacher contracts, early retirement programs for teachers and annual teacher evaluations.
Proposition 2, which included teacher and administration bonuses corresponding to the increase of student test scores, had a 58 percent refusal and 42 percent acceptance.
The last of these 18-month-old laws, Proposition 3 stated that part of the state’s education fund will go toward new technology in the classroom.
This was the most drastically rejected of the three, with 67 percent of voters in opposition and only 33 percent in favor of the propositions.
According to the Associated Press, the campaign in favor of saving the propositions was one of the most expensive in Idaho history, costing about $6 million.