Elder James W. McConkie III spoke with his wife Laurel, at the first devotional for June.

Sister McConkie spoke about the importance of having a relationship with Heavenly Father through “sacred and honest prayer.”

“When we practice secret, private, honest, vulnerable prayer to God the Father, we connect to Him and to our brother Jesus Christ. We can rely on them. We can learn Their will for us,” Sister McConkie said.

Sister McConkie addressing BYU-I students at devotional.

Sister McConkie addressing BYU-I students at devotional. Photo credit: BYU-Idaho photo by Malia Vick

Sister McConkie invited attendees to continue to grow in their relationship with Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ through grief, celebrations and “everything in between.”

Elder McConkie followed his wife’s address, focusing on President Russell M. Nelsons study of the Kirtland Temple dedicatory prayer and his recent invitation to study the prayer in Doctrine and Covenants Section 109 and its related events.

“It is a prophetic invitation intended to help us better understand the true nature of God, our relationship to Him, the power of our covenants with Him, and the ways in which we can connect more powerfully with heaven in the temple,” Elder McConkie said.

Elder McConkie addressed BYU-I students at the devotional.

Elder James W. McConkie III addressed BYU-I students at the devotional. Photo credit: BYU-Idaho photo by Malia Vick

Tanner Peterson, a senior studying biomedical science, reflected on his experience after the devotional.

“The testimony of Elder James W. McConkie III helped me focus on our prophet and his focus on the house of the Lord,” Peterson said. “I now realize how the blessings of the past affect me today.”

President Meredith visits with Paul W. Lambert after devotional.

President Meredith visits with Paul W. Lambert after devotional. Photo credit: Michael Lewis

Religion Initiative Director at the Wheatley Institute, BYU, Paul W. Lambert, addressed BYU-I as the second devotional speaker in June.

In his address, Elder Lambert urged BYU-I students to remember that religion and faith matter, your divine potential and purpose and to put, “the Lord first, always and everywhere.”

To emphasize the importance of his three chosen topics, Elder Lambert shared his personal experience with his dying father as a recently returned missionary.

Elder Lamberts father said, “I don’t know if I’ll be healed. But whatever the outcome, I want to ensure that I’ve placed my life in the hands of the Lord. If I fully recover, I want to be aligned with the Lord. And if I don’t recover, I want to be aligned with the Lord. Being in the Lord’s hands is the only place where there is promise and peace.”

Devotional with Sister Becky L. Craven and Brother Ronald L. Craven.

Devotional with Sister Becky L. Craven and Brother Ronald L. Craven. Photo credit: BYU-Idaho photo by Michael Lewis

As the third June speaker, President Ronald L. Craven of the Salt Lake City Headquarters Mission spoke on the need for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to be “doers of the work.”

“Work is an eternal is an eternal principle and has been taught from the foundation of the world,” President Craven said.

According to President Craven, it is important to build, “a work ethic that elevates your studies enhances your ability to develop personal talents and prepares and sustains you in your chosen careers.”

To self-evaluate personal work ethic, President Craven invited students to ask themselves if they are dependable, responsible, show initiative, love to learn, do more and stay focused.

President Craven advised listeners to be honest in all they do, to never settle for less than the best and to “be quick to observe and seek first the kingdom of God.”

President Craven’s wife, Sister Rebecca L. Craven, former Second Counselor in the Young Women General Presidency, followed his remarks. Her talk focused on the need for covenant leaders and what it means to be a covenant leader.

According to Sister Craven, an important trait that covenant leaders possess is humility.

Be the servant, recognize that revelation is scattered among us, understand that difference is not necessarily wrong, ask inspired questions, build unity, be teachable, avoid spiritual manipulation and find joy,” said Sister Craven.

Music is preformed by students at BYU-Idaho during the weekly devotional.

Music is preformed by students at BYU-Idaho during the weekly devotional. Photo credit: BYU-Idaho photo by Lauren Bushman

In the last devotional of June, the Second Counselor in the Young Women General Presidency, Sister Andrea Muñoz Spannaus, spoke to students about the need for light and truth.

The tools to gain light and truth are through fasting and praying. According to Sister Spannaus, fasting and prayer grant greater self-control, gratitude, generosity and submission.

Sister Spannuas shared a QR code survey during the devotional students and asked BYU-I students what they experience the most when they fast and pray regularly with the options of self-control, gratitude, generosity or submission. She showed the live results through a pie chart.

Her husband, Alin Spannaus, was invited to get up several times to speak about his own experiences he had had through regular fasting and prayer.

Sister Spannuas concluded the devotional by offering this question to students: “What are you willing to give?”

“Throughout Sister Spannaus’s talk, I often thought about how Latter-day Saints need to remember more about the latter-day part of our name, thinking of Christ’s return as if it was tomorrow and thus using fasting and prayer as a means of renewing our spirits to accomplish the Lord’s work,” said Ryan Funk, a senior studying computer science and a member of the BYU-I Concert Choir.