Mike Glasscock sees his run for mayor as the culmination of decades in government work and his deep love for Rexburg.

“I think Rexburg is a special place,” Glasscock said. “If I could choose to live anywhere on the planet, this is where I would pick. We’re gonna grow — we can’t really stop that, but we can determine how it grows.”

Glasscock moved to Rexburg ten years ago from Rancho Cordova, California, to be closer to his grandchildren. After being involved with Parks and Recreation and the state Department of Welfare, he couldn’t put his instincts away.

Glasscock and his family celebrating Christmas in 2016.

Glasscock and his family celebrating Christmas in 2016. Photo credit: Mike Glasscock

“The public in the city of Rexburg, by and large, is happy with the city government, but they want to know what’s going on,” Glasscock said, echoing remarks from other citizens at recent city council meetings. “They want to know how they can help, and they’re willing to help.”

Glasscock wants to be that link between the community and the city, as well as to expand cooperation with BYU-Idaho.

“I think that the city needs a spokesman, and the public needs somebody to represent them,” Glasscock said.

An unlikely start

The temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are the start of many things. For some, a marriage; for others, a deeper relationship with God.

They’re not, usually, the start of a political career. For Glasscock, it was.

Glasscock was ecstatic when the church announced a new temple in his city of Sacramento, California. When construction began in August 2004, things got more complicated.

“There was opposition (to the temple), and it kind of irritated me,” Glasscock said. “So I decided I’m just going to put my name on the ballot to get my name out there.”

Sacramento California Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Sacramento California Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Glasscock entered his name for the Cordova Recreation and Park District board of directors, in Rancho Cordova, California. He saw it less as a legitimate campaign than a statement of dissatisfaction with the way the community was treating the Church.

He made no speeches, no posters and no pamphlets. But, by the November election, word had gotten around about his campaign.

“I remember coming out of the bedroom (that morning) and I said ‘I guess I better call up somebody and tell them I concede,'” Glasscock recalls. “And my wife goes ‘No, you won!'”

He served on the board from 2004-2008. Other than helping with the temple construction, Glasscock’s proudest work during that time was the transformation of an old U.S. Air Force base into a public park. The park features athletic fields, a swimming pool and lots of open space.

A picnic area from the Mather Sports Complex that Glasscock helped organize.

A picnic area from the Mather Sports Complex that Glasscock helped organize. Photo credit: Cordova Parks & Recreation

“The City of Rancho Cordova is a very culturally diverse city,” reads a portion of Glasscock’s 2004 candidacy statement. “We need facilities for community recreation and activities so that we can continue to build goodwill among our citizens.”

Glasscock has carried that view of city culture and the importance of parks to Rexburg. With new parks in development and a new comprehensive city plan, he feels his past work will be applicable.

Unlike his previous campaign, Glasscock plans to spread his campaign with flyers and posters. He will also attend the “Meet the Candidates” forum on Thursday, Oct. 12.