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President gives advice for future success

President Clark answers a question at Student Q-and-A Sept. 26. President Clark said that the Student Q&A started Fall Semester 2012 after he realized how many students were coming to the faculty Q-and-A. JAMES MOSS | Scroll Photography
President Clark answers a question at Student Q-and-A Sept. 26. President Clark said that the Student Q&A started Fall Semester 2012 after he realized how many students were coming to the faculty Q-and-A. JAMES MOSS | Scroll Photography

On Sept. 26, a question and answer forum was held for students to ask Kim B. Clark, president of BYU-Idaho, and his presidency questions.

President Clark answered a variety of questions concerning the skills that are most important for students to learn before leaving BYU-I.

“Take with you your commitment to serve the Lord,” President Clark said.

President Clark said that if students take what they learn and the spirit they have felt at BYU-I with them when they graduate, they will have success.

President Clark said that the most important thing for students to learn, from a secular view, is the ability to get things done and express ideas well to others through strong writing and speaking.

“We have the reputation of training people who can really write and can edit,” President Clark said.

President Henry J. Eyring said the Lord has given them finite time to finish all things. Through the sacrifices that students make to attend BYU-I, President Eyring said that students will be accompanied by the Spirit to increase deep learning.

President Clark also answered questions regarding students’ lives after college.

President Clark said that if students aspire to be leaders, they won’t be. Students must make their most fundamental goals centered on the gospel.

“You will go where the Lord wants you to go, because he will open the doors,” President Clark said.

President Clark addressed students on the topic of prosperity; he said that if students put prosperity as their goal, they will not reach that goal. But if students follow the Lord’s commandments, He will prosper and bless them.

The presidency addressed questions and concerns about student living.

Kevin Miyasaki, student services and activities vice president, said the best thing to do if students do not feel the Spirit in their apartment is to meet as an apartment and counsel together about what could be done to invite the Spirit back.

Nick Hicken, a junior studying accounting, said that he had a question concerning how to sport the good things about other cultures and religions. Hicken said he knew it would be a good place to ask his question because President Clark is very clear and straightforward.

“I trust what he says,” Hicken said.

President Clark said that students can help others feel welcome on campus by embracing the truths of other religions and cultures, based on the truths of the gospel.

“As long as you plant your feet on gospel ground, you will be solid,” President Clark said.

Laura Clair, a senior studying communication, said that she went to the question and answer forum as an opportunity to learn more about the school and to gain a deeper appreciation of BYU-Idaho and its history.

She said that the session gave her a greater appreciation for the university and a desire to develop stronger writing skills to communicate ideas to others.

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