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Respecting differences through performance

BYU-Idaho is home to many different people from diverse cultures. There’s a total of 19,235 students enrolled; 44.8% of this student population is ethnically diverse. With so many various cultures, Cultural Night gives these students a stage, with the spotlight on who they are and where they came from.

The Grand Ballroom on the Hyrum Manwaring Student Center will stage music and dance during this semester’s Cultural Night on March 14 from 7 to 9 p.m. The performing groups will represent many different cultures ranging from the Pacific to the Atlantic seas, the Indian Ocean to the Sea of Japan.

A traditional Pacific Islander dance.
A traditional Pacific Islander dance.

“I love (Cultural Night) because we have so many different ethnicities, and races and people from all over the world on campus,” said Jenifer Lang, a senior studying communication and the event coordinator over Cultural Night. “I think it really gives those students a chance to show them what they’re about.”

This is not the first time some of these students have taken the stage, and since the participants enjoy it so much, it might not be their last.

The group dances to a fun K-Pop song.
The group dances to a fun K-Pop song.

“I think it’s my favorite event of the semester,” said Harmony Leauanae, a junior studying nursing and a dancer from the Korean Pop dance group called GGA.

With the groups divided into different cultures, they perform with the intent to show the world the beauty and uniqueness that comes with it.

With Mexico being one of the cultures represented, audience members can learn that although Mexico has its own culture spreading across the country, each state in Mexico has its own twist.

“It’s really awesome to know the different cultures of the different states and be able to represent them through dance,” said Daniella De La Rosa, a junior studying political science and a dancer from The Spirit of Mexico dance team.

His fingers play as he blows into the bagpipes.
His fingers play as he blows into the bagpipes.

With almost 14 different groups performing, it will be a night of cultural expression with people who want to show that their roots run deep.

“It’s gonna be a super fun night,” Lang said. “Come and experience something new.”

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