Home News University makes a brief statement on no longer accepting Medicaid

University makes a brief statement on no longer accepting Medicaid

BYU-Idaho released an official notice outlining that the school will no longer be accepting Medicaid but gives few answers to those wondering why.

“The university has decided to not accept the Idaho Expanded Medicaid program, which takes effect January 1, 2020, to serve as an insurance waiver option,” the notice reads. “We welcome concerned students to visit with Health Center representatives for more information about their healthcare options.”

Students discovered the change when attempting to register for classes for the upcoming Winter 2020 semester. In previous semesters, students could use Medicaid as an acceptable alternative to the Student Health Plan.

In Nov. 2018, Idaho voters chose to expand Medicaid to those whose income is 138% of the federal poverty level. Around 60% of Idaho votes cast supported Proposition 2, formally known as Medicaid Expansion.

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare spokeswoman Niki Forbing-Orr told Scroll that, currently, 6,420 individuals are on Medicaid in Madison County. As part of the Jan. 2020 expansion, 1,542 Madison County residents are enrolled so far.

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